Go To Search
Click to Home
Site Tools
2010 Winners
2010 Joint Architectural Review Board Winners
2010 WinnersThe boards have collaborated to create the Joint Architectural Review Board (JARB) and an annual awards program to recognize exceptional projects in the local historic districts.

The awards are intended to be presented in the month of May in conjunction with National Preservation Month.

The 2010 JARB award winners are pictured to the right. Details about the award winners are below.



Shoes Cup and Cork Club Before Shoes Cup and Cork Club After
Category:
Restoration
Project: Shoes Cup and Cork Club
Property: 17 North King Street in the Leesburg Old and Historic District
Owner: Ed Shihadeh

Project Description: The project is a storefront rehabilitation at 17 North King Street. Specific details include rehabilitation of the historic neon sign and recovering / reusing the historic awning framework. The building was a shoe repair shop through the second half of the 20th century.

The property owners purchased and rehabilitated the building for use as a coffee shop and wine bar. The curious name of Shoes is largely a result of the neon sign, which was partially rehabilitated. The top portion was repainted and fitted with new neon tubing. They chose to leave the bottom portion unfinished, which helps convey the sense that the neon sign is historic and continues to tell the story of the building’s historic use.



Waterford Old School Before
Waterford Old School After
Category:
Rehabilitation / Restoration
Project: Waterford Old School Restoration
Property: Fairfax Street in the Waterford Historic District
Owner: Waterford Foundation

Project Description: In coordination with the Virginia Department of Historic Resources, the Loudoun County HDRC, and the community, the Waterford Foundation rehabilitated and restored the Waterford Old School to its original condition. The Waterford Foundation followed the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation for the interior restoration as well.

The most detailed part of the restoration included the salvage and repair of original window frames, sashes, and glass window panes. Restoration also included changes to meet current building code requirements, including the installation of a rear fire escape, which is a new feature on the old school building.

The school reopened its doors in 2008.







Purcellville Public Safety CenterCategory: New Construction
Project: Purcellville Public Safety Center
Property: 500 North Maple Street in the Purcellville Historic District
Owners: Loudoun County

Project Description: The Purcellville Public Safety Center, completed in 2009, is the home of the Purcellville Volunteer Fire Company No. 2 and the Purcellville Volunteer Rescue Squad No. 14.

The 23,000 square-foot, joint fire-rescue station was partially funded by Loudoun County, the Town of Purcellville, and the volunteer fire and rescue companies. The building takes its overall design clues from the historic Purcellville Train Station and incorporates modern materials and features typical of fire-rescue stations including large over-head doors and a hose tower.



Facade Renovation Before
Facade Renovation After
Category:
Renovation
Project: Façade Renovation of 102 Washington Street
Property: 102 Washington Street in the Middleburg District
Owners: Daniel Kaseman

Project Description: This façade renovation project involved renovating the existing building facade to define two distinct buildings. Previous renovations to the buildings, completed prior to the historic district regulation, reflected a more contemporary style.

Renovation of the federal style building on the right involved new trim work, the addition of a stone water table, and painting the building. To distinguish the building on the left, the owner employed a colonial adaptation adding pillars, siding, trim work, and a new pent roof in addition to relocating and changing windows in the second floor and painting the building.

The result is an inviting street frontage, which is more in context with its surroundings. The project was completed in 2009.







Adaptive Use Before
Adaptive Use After
Category:
Adaptive Use
Project: Reuse of 7 Washington Street
Property: 7 Washington Street in the Middleburg Historic District
Owners: Charles Carroll

Project Description: This stone building was built in 1886 and has seen many uses over the years.

In the early years, the building was used as the main meeting place for events in Middleburg. In the 1930s, the building became a car dealership and sold Chevrolets until 1985. In the late 1980s, prior to historic district regulation, the building was converted into Middleburg Plaza with a rather unsympathetic alteration to the existing building.

When the building changed hands in the early 2000s, the new owner undertook extensive renovations so that the building would be more in keeping with the streetscape. The owner opened one of the stone arches to create a more inviting entrance to the complex of businesses. The project was completed in 2002. 






William James House Porch Before William James House Porch After
Category:
Restoration Detail
Project: William James House Porch Reconstruction
Property: 40187 Main Street in the Waterford Historic District
Owners: Rich and Jennifer Biby

Project Description: The William James House on Main Street in Waterford is a circa 1856 frame house constructed with Greek Revival style design elements. A pedimented portico and brick entry steps replaced the original porch in 1960.

William James House Porch circa 1900
In 2006, the owners received a Certificate of Appropriateness from the Loudoun County HDRC for demolition of the pedimented portico, construction of a new porch that matched the size, configuration, and design details of the original porch (including porch floor and stone risers), and restoration of the original front door. The applicants used historic photographs and analyzed existing historic architectural features to design the porch as is existed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

A circa 1900 photograph shows the original porch and front door. The porch and entry features have been faithfully reconstructed. Note the porch columns, entablature, and the paired 3-light side transoms around the original front door.



Stone Wall Before
Stone Wall After
Category:
Landscape Feature
Project: Stone Wall Reconstruction
Property: Goose Creek Meeting House, 18204 Lincoln Road, in the Goose Creek Historic District
Owner: Goose Creek Meeting

Project Description: This application was approved in 2008 for the demolition and reconstruction of this dry-laid stone wall along Lincoln Road. The wall, constructed in the mid 20th century with stones harvested from local farms, articulates the edge of the original Goose Creek Quaker Meeting House property.

Noted stonemason and Goose Creek native, Allen Cochran, had been repairing portions of the wall for a number of years. This application proposed the disassembly of the wall and reconstruction of the wall with reinforced compacted aggregate footings using the same stones and without altering the length or height of the wall.

The reconstruction of the stone wall, a project relatively small in scope, enhances a distinct landscape feature at the southern entrance to the Village of Lincoln and is a reminder that attention to the small details can have a great impact in a historic community.



Shenandoah Furniture Gallery SignCategory: Signage
Project: Shenandoah Furniture Gallery Sign
Property: 151 West Main Street in the Purcellville Historic District
Owner: Vickie Kelley and Charles Funk

Project Description: The Shenandoah Furniture Gallery, located at 151 West Main Street in Purcellville, specializes in custom wood furniture constructed of recycled and reclaimed lumber, salvaged from barns and outbuildings in and around Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley.

The business, established in November of 2005, is a staple of Purcellville’s downtown. The hand-painted sign pays homage to Purcellville’s history as the agricultural and market center of western Loudoun while also capturing the charm of the historic downtown.



Waterford Village Gateway SignsCategory: Signage
Project: Waterford Village "Gateway Signs"
Property: Entrances to Waterford Historic District
Owner: Waterford Citizens Association

Project Description: As part of a plan to address increased traffic in the Village, the Waterford Citizens Association designed “Gateway Signs” and placed them at three major vehicular Village entrances, providing a visual cue to the driver to slow down while passing through. The signs are an original design that incorporates symbols, lines, and colors specific to Waterford. The acorn represents the early chair manufacturing in the Village and the lines and details replicate architectural elements common to its historic buildings. Located in the VDOT right-of-way, the Waterford Citizens Association was not required to gain approval of the design by the Loudoun County HDRC. However, the Association elected to have the HDRC review the sign design and the Committee passed a resolution in support of the design in 2007.

As part of a plan to address increased traffic in the Village, the Waterford Citizens Association designed “Gateway Signs” and placed them at three major vehicular Village entrances, providing a visual cue to the driver to slow down while passing through. The signs are an original design that incorporates symbols, lines, and colors specific to Waterford. The acorn represents the early chair manufacturing in the Village and the lines and details replicate architectural elements common to its historic buildings. Located in the VDOT right-of-way, the Waterford Citizens Association was not required to gain approval of the design by the Loudoun County HDRC. However, the Association elected to have the HDRC review the sign design and the Committee passed a resolution in support of the design in 2007.

Loudoun On
Site Tools