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2009 Winners
Joint Architectural Review Board Preservation Awards
In 2008, the inaugural year, the JARB awarded seven projects in five categories. The Board of Supervisors presented JARB awards to 11 projects in seven categories at the May 19, 2009, Board Business Meeting.

The following are the 2009 award recipients.



Residential-to-Commercial Conversion Before
Residential-to-Commercial Conversion After
Category:
Adaptive Use
Project: Residential-to-Commercial Conversion
Property: 111 East Washington Street in the Middleburg Historic District
Owner: Mastercraft Homes

Project Description: This early-nineteenth-century stone dwelling at the corner of East Washington and South Hamilton Streets was vacant for 10 years before being purchased and rehabilitated by Mastercraft Homes for use as a commercial office. The one-story rear ell was severely dilapidated, and the entire structure was deteriorating.

The rehabilitation project included demolition of the ell and the construction of a new two-story ell with an accessible ramp, removal of the front porch and construction of a stylistically appropriate replacement, and restoration of the stonework, windows, and other features.







Fence Restoration in the Waterford Historic District Before Fence Restoration in the Waterford Historic District After
Category:
Architectural Details
Project: Fence Restoration in the Waterford Historic District
Property: Clarks Gap Road and Factory Street in the Waterford Historic District
Owner: Marilyn Gentry

Project Description: This wrought iron fence marks a significant corner on Clarks Gap Road in the Waterford Historic District.

When Mrs. Gentry applied to restore the fence to its original character, the entire fence was corroded with rust and several parts of it were bent or supported by wood stakes to keep it from falling over.

Restoring, rather than replacing, the fence, an important detail in the Waterford Historic District, helps maintain the character of the streetscape at this entrance to the village.



Proposed Bus Shelter
Constructed Bus Shelter
Category:
New Construction
Project: New Bus Shelter for the Virginia Regional Transit Authority
Property: Intersection of Harrison Street SE and Depot Court in the Leesburg Historic District
Owners: Town of Leesburg and the Virginia Regional Transit Authority

Project Description: Instead of using a pre-fabricated metal shelter with Victorian details, the Leesburg Board of Architectural Review urged the Town of Leesburg to design a context-appropriate bus shelter.

The result is a structure that reflects and respects the character of the surrounding historic and non-historic structures. The new structure incorporates design features that are characteristic of traditional design in Leesburg’s Old and Historic District.












Loudoun Valley Community Center Before
Loudoun Valley Community Center After
Category:
Renovation-Addition
Project: Addition to the Loudoun Valley Community Center
Property: 320 West School Street in the Purcellville Historic District
Owners: Loudoun County

Project Description: The most significant part of this project is the historically sympathetic addition constructed on the front of the 1923 school building.

The addition incorporates design features that are consistent with the original structure.

The project even included the reconstruction, based on photographic documentation, of the original cupola at the center of the roof. And at the urging of local residents, the architects were able to design the addition to avoid disturbing an historic weeping cherry tree on the property.






Maloney House Before
Maloney House After
Category:
Renovation-Addition
Project: Addition to the Maloney House
Property: Shelburne Glebe Road in the Goose Creek Historic District
Owners: Carol and Charles Maloney

Project Description: The owners wished to construct an addition to the side of the circa 1800 dwelling, but were concerned about possibly overwhelming the scale and character of the original structure.

Maximizing the topography of the site, they worked with architect Jeannie White and contractor Richard Bloom to design an addition following the linear pattern of the house. They used large expanses of windows on the enclosed porch and stone on the foundation to break up the visual mass of the addition.









Wyatt-Ratcliff House Before
Wyatt-Ratcliff House After
Category:
Renovation-Addition
Project: Addition to the Wyatt-Ratcliff House
Property: Main Street in the Waterford Historic District
Owners: Cate Magennis Wyatt and Steve Wyatt

Project Description: Although this project is also a residential addition, the characteristics of the surrounding historic district called for an approach that was different from the Maloney residence in the rural historic district.

Working with architect Kevin Ruedisueli, the owners developed an addition that uses the same façade planes, but is narrower and has a lower roofline to help distinguish the old from the new.

One of the most unique features is the impeccable dry-laid stonework on the exterior.










Home Farm Butchers and Graziers Sign Before Home Farm Butchers and Graziers Sign After
Category:
Signage
Project: New sign for the Home Farm Butchers and Graziers
Property: 1 East Washington Street in the Middleburg Historic District
Owner: Ayrshire Farm

Project Description: The creatively designed sign features traditional materials carved and gilded letters combined with a custom portrait of Duncan, Ayrshire Farm’s prized Scottish Highlander Bull.

The new sign fits the scale of the two-story Neoclassical-style building. The concept of the sign was to evoke the feeling of a British butcher shop.



Lightfoot Restaurant Patio Before
Lightfoot Restaurant Patio After
Category:
Landscape Design
Project: Outdoor Patio
Property: 10 West Market Street in the Leesburg Historic District
Owner: Lightfoot Restaurant

Project Description: Rather than simply re-pave the existing parking lot, the owners elected to revisit the entire concept for the area behind Lightfoot Restaurant. They designed a dual-purpose space that is easily adaptable as the seasons change.

Using traditional materials, they created a historically sympathetic patio for outdoor dining in the warmer months; in the winter, the stanchions are removed so that the space can continue to be used for parking.

In addition to the improved paving, the project also incorporated a new fountain, low retaining wall, and new dumpster enclosure.







China King Restaurant Before China King Restaurant After
Category:
Restoration / Rehabilitation
Project: Storefront Restoration
Property: 5 South King Street in the Leesburg Historic District
Owner: China King Restaurant

Project Description: The China King storefront, covered in historic structural Carrara glass circa 1940, had an extensive amount of damaged or missing pieces replaced with faded Plexiglas.

Although the owners obtained approval for removal of the Carrara glass, they continued researching options for rehabilitation and restoration of the existing storefront.

The structural glass is no longer produced, but they contacted a supplier-contractor based in St. Louis, Missouri, who worked with the owners to design a compatible storefront making use of two different colors of Carrara glass. This polychroming effect was commonly used during the second quarter of the twentieth century and adds character to the restored storefront.



Building Restoration Before
Building Restoration After
Category:
Restoration / Rehabilitation
Project: Building Restoration
Property: 133 East Main Street in the Purcellville Historic District
Owner: Lauten Construction

Project Description: A significant property on Main Street in historic Purcellville, the building was extensively dilapidated, with a deteriorating metal roof, failing and missing shutters, a rotted front porch, and failing gutters.

The restoration project, which preserves the historic character of the building, included a new metal roof with hand-folded seams, custom operable shutters, half-round gutters, and a flagstone porch.









Griffith-Glover House Before
Griffith-Glover House After
Category: Restoration / Rehabilitation
Project: Building Restoration
Property: Griffith-Glover House in the Waterford Historic District
Owner: Cornelia Flagg Keller

Project Description: To say this project was extensive is an understatement. In 2000, the owner saved this early-nineteenth century structure from demolition by neglect through the complete restoration of this log and frame residence and its unique early-twentieth century outdoor hardscape features, such as the circa 1930s dance pavilion and concrete megaphone in the rear yard.

Not only was this historic property, located just east of the Waterford mill saved by the restoration and rehabilitation, the project had a huge and positive impact on Main Street, a gateway into the village.

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