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Upper Broad Run Watershed Management Plan
 link to larger map of watershed
Report to TLUC Committee 
The final report of the Upper Broad Run Watershed Management Plan project to the Board of Supervisors' Transportation and Land Use Committee (TLUC) was made on January 16, 2015. The item prepared for the meeting is online:


Final Report is Online
The Upper Broad Run Watershed Management Plan
Final Report prepared by the county's consultant on the project is available online:


Community Meeting Held June 24, 2014
Residents of the Upper Broad Run Watershed were invited to attend a community meeting on the Upper Broad Run Watershed Management Plan Tuesday, June 24, 2014, at John Champe High School in Aldie. The presentation given at the meeting is online:


Interim Report is Online
The Upper Broad Run Watershed Management Plan Interim Report prepared by the county’s consultant on the project is available online:
Presentation to Watershed Partnership Workgroup 
The presentation on the Upper Broad Run Watershed Management Plan Pilot Project made to the Watershed Partnership Workgroup (WPW) on June 5, 2014. The presentation is online:

Note: Previous presentations to the WPW may be found at the bottom of this web page.

WRTAC Presentation is Online

An update on the Upper Broad Run Watershed Management Plan Pilot Project was presented to the Loudoun County Water Resources Technical Advisory Committee on February 24, 2014. The presentation is online:


Community Meeting Presentation is Online
A public information meeting on the Upper Broad Run Watershed Management Plan was held September 16, 2013, to provide information to residents and other interested members of the public about the project. The presentation given at the meeting is online:


As part of Loudoun County’s water resources management efforts, the county engaged in a pilot project to develop the Upper Broad Run Watershed Management Plan. The Upper Broad Run project was intended to be a pilot for detailed watershed management planning in Loudoun County.  The pilot project was proposed by the Water Resources Technical Advisory Committee (WRTAC) and approved by the Board of Supervisors. You may view a map of the study area here or by clicking the image above at right.

What is a Watershed?
Watersheds, the area of land where all water drains to a common point, are the fundamental unit of water resources management.   A watershed that is not functioning properly will have erosion, flooding, polluted surface water and groundwater, reduced groundwater recharge, ‘flashy’ stream flow, and threatened drinking water supplies.  Identifying existing or potential watershed problems and correcting /preventing them are the goals of watershed management because it is less expensive to prevent problems now than to correct them in the future.
 photo of upper broad run

What is a Watershed Plan?
Implementing a watershed plan involves employing various structural and non-structural Best Management Practices (BMPs) to address existing or predicted problems.  Structural BMPs may include stormwater structures that reduce flooding, stream buffer plantings to filter and slow runoff, or restoration of eroded stream banks.  Non-structural BMPs involve developing good stewardship practices such as limiting fertilizer application, community stream cleanups, and education about good watershed practices.

Though not mandated, watershed management is a practical, effective, and economically reasonable approach to meet existing and future water quality standards.  Additionally, watershed management planning can effectively identify needs and evaluate cost/benefits of BMPs that will help to achieve Virginia’s Phase II Watershed Implementation Plan (WIP) pollutant reduction goals.

Through a competitive bidding process, the county entered into a contract with Versar, Inc. for development of the Upper Broad Run Watershed Management Plan.  The project, scheduled to be completed by June 2014, included these tasks:

  • Public outreach, explanation, and participation, including the development of a Watershed Partnership Workgroup
  • Watershed assessment
  • Watershed management strategy

Watershed Partnership Workgroup
A representative, knowledgeable, engaged and constructive group of stakeholders is essential for effective watershed management.  These stakeholders collaborated to identify and work towards common watershed goals using solutions supported by the community, rather than a regulatory or mandated approach.  The stakeholders consist of landowners, residents, businesses, community organizations, local government, stormwater management and water supply experts, environmental specialists, and other members of the community.  The workgroup had the unique capability to provide project staff with first-hand accounts of watershed issues, and served as a sounding board for proposed management solutions.


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